Latest Tables of Contents with Summaries

2022 Том 6, №1
Transcatheter pulmonary valve imlantation after surgical correction of right ventricular outflow tract: the experience of one center
P. Charnahlaz, V. Kadochkin, Y. Linnik, K. Drozdovski
Transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation (TPVI) is a relatively new method of treating patients with right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) dysfunction after surgical treatment of congenital heart defects. Since its introduction in 2000 by Bonhoeffer, more than ten thousand of such procedures have been performed worldwide. Currently two types of valves are available in the Republic of Belarus: Melody TPVMedtronic and Edwards Sapien.
TPVI is safe and effective in the majority of patients with RVOT dysfunction and in some selected patients with patched RVOT. The low complication rate and the reduced number of open-chest re-interventions over a patient’s lifetime are among the main advantages of the procedure. The article presents a literature review, and summarizes the experience and results of TPVI performed on 24 patients in the Republican Centre of Pediatric Surgery.
Results of surgical treatment of acute lower limb ischemia in patients with SARS-COV-2 infection
V. Khryshchanovich, I. Klimchuk, N. Rogovoy, E. Nelipovich, A. Pavlov
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) refers to viral respiratory infections and is the predisposing factor for the development of venous and arterial thrombotic events due to a pronounced inflammatory response, platelet activation, endothelial dysfunction and stasis. Recent studies have confirmed an extremely high incidence of thromboembolic events, especially in the group of patients with severe coronavirus pneumonia. There have been an increasing number of reports of peripheral arterial thrombosis as well. Most cases of arterial thrombosis are noted in critically ill patients in intensive care units. At the same time, acute limb ischemia often occurred in the absence of serious comorbid conditions and was accompanied by high rates of amputations and deaths.
Herein we report the results of management of 14 patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection and acute lower limb ischemia. Our own series of clinical observations shows that open thrombectomy and standard parenteral anticoagulation are ineffective in more than one third of cases. The pathogenesis mechanisms of COVID-19-associated arterial thrombosis should be further investigated in order to develop an optimal therapeutic strategy.
A clinical case of intracardiac thrombosis associated with SARS-COV-2 infection
A. Pleshko, T. Statkevich, E. Petrova, N. Mitkovskaya
The damage to humanity and global healthcare done by the COVID-19 pandemic is hard to overestimate. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were more than 500 million confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection, more than 6 million of which were fatal. The high incidence of arterial thrombosis and venous thromboembolic complications despite the ongoing antithrombotic therapy, often leading to death in patients with new coronavirus infection SARS-CoV-2, indicates the need for profound study of the pathogenetic aspects of procoagulant status and a more rational personalized approach in prophylactic measures in this category of patients. Special interest is the development of thrombotic complications in COVID-19 convalescents.
This article presents a clinical case of a 43-year-old man with no car-diovascular history who suffered viral myocarditis with thrombus formation in the heart cavities, thrombosis of deep veins of the lower extremities and consequent pulmonary thromboembolism, all of which developed within a month after coronavirus infection. In the article authors discuss the leading pathophysiological mechanisms that potentially could propagate the development of thrombosis and thromboembolic complications in patients with COVID-19.
A clinical case of non-compaction cardiomyopathy with concomitant myopathic syndrome and mutations in the LMNA and KCNH2 genes
S. Komissarova, N. Rineiska, N. Chakova, T. Dolmatovich
A clinical case of a patient with non-compaction cardiomyopathy, early development of life-threatening arrhythmias and conduction disorders, myopathic syndrome and mutations in the LMNA and KCNH2 genes is presented. The issues of diagnostics based on imaging technologies, complex differential diagnostics of non-compaction cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as the basic principles of treatment are discussed. We also present the main provisions of European and American experts on the concept of isolation of lamina-associated cardiomyopathies for mandatory molecular genetic testing and, if identified, early implantation of ICD for the prevention of SCD.
Angina pectoris without obstructive coronary lesion (Part 2). Diagnosic methods in clinical practice
S. Solovey
Coronary vasomotor disorders are a common cause of angina pectoris without obstructive lesion of the coronary arteries (CA). Over the past decade, various non-invasive and invasive diagnostic methods have made it possible to comprehensively assess coronary vasomotor function and determine the endotypes of epicardial and microvascular dysfunction, which is important for stratification of cardiovascular risk and individualization of patient treatment. The basis for the diagnosis of the complex interaction of vasodilation and vasoconstriction of various parts of the coronary bed is a comprehensive intracoronary functional testing, which is recommended if the angina symptoms are persisting against the background of angiographically unchanged or moderately stenosed, blood flow non-limiting coronary arteries. The established parameters characterizing adequate vasodilation are coronary blood flow reserve and microvascular resistance. Increased vasoconstriction potential is diagnosed by intracoronary provocation test with acetylcholine, which allows verification of epicardial and/or microvascular vasospasm. The article discusses standardized criteria, non-invasive imaging methodsand modern invasive examination algorithms used in the diagnosis of microvascular and vasospastic angina.
Risk factors for postcardiotomy low cardiac output syndrome after on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting
R. Yarosh, L. Shestakova
Aim. To determine the risk factors for postcardiotomy syndrome of low cardiac output in patients after on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.
Methods. The study included 157 patients who underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Intraoperatively and in the early postoperative period, 25 patients developed postcardiotomy low cardiac output syndrome (PLCOS), which was refractory to drug therapy and followed by mechanical circulatory support (MCS). 132 patients did not develop PLCOS and did not require MCS (comparison group).
Long-term outcomes after correction of long coronary lesions using biodegradable vascular scaffolds
Nikolai Strygo, Valeriy Stelmashok, Oleg Polonetsky
Materials and methods. Over the period of 2013 to 2018, endovascular correction of long (more than 25 mm) coronary artery lesions was performed on 80 patients in RSPC “Cardiology”, Minsk. Randomly the patients were divided into 2 groups: experimental group (EG) (n = 40) – endovascular correction with bioresorbable everolimus-eluting vascular scaffold Absorb BVS, and control group (CG) (n = 40) – endovascular correction with everolimus-eluting metallic stent Xience V/ Xience Pro. During further observations we estimated the development of death outcomes (from any reasons and from heart diseases), cases of acute myocardial infarction, incidence of revascularization due to target lesion patency failure, as well as a combined endpoint (all death cases + cases of acute myocardial infarction+ revascularization due to target lesion patency failure). The information about the presence or absence of negative outcomes was collected during the observation via a telephone contact with the patient or their relatives.
Cardiac assessment of large-for-gestational-age and small-for-gestational-age newborns
V. Prylutskaya, A. Sukalo
The aim of the study was to assess the cardiovascular status of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) full-term newborns.
A survey of 192 newborns was carried out on the basis of the Republican Scientific and Practical Center “Mother and Child”. Group 1 (Gr1) consisted of 54 large-for-gestational-age newborns, group 2 (Gr2) – 43 small-for-gestational-age newborns, group 3 (Gr3) – 95 newborns with physical development corresponding to gestational age (appropriate for gestational age). Echocardiographic parameters were compared between study groups, as corrected to body surface area.
Morphometric assessment of heart structures in the course of Echo-CG in Gr1 patients showed a statistically significant thickening of the heart walls with predominant localization in the posterior wall of the left ventricle (LV) and interventricular septum (IVS). Significant differences were found in all derivatives of echocardiographic indicators in the examined groups of newborns. In Gr2, signs of diastolic myocardial dysfunction were revealed reflecting an impairment of the age-related evolution of myocardial relaxation processes. The intragroup analyses of LGA and SGA neonates (subgrouped according to the birth weight percentile) revealed no statistically significant differences in the direct and derived echocardiographic parameters analyzed. The frequency of detection of open foramen ovale (PFO), IVS thickness of 5.0 mm and more in LGA newborns had greater as compared with the group of conditionally healthy infants (р = 0.038, р = 0.001). Fetal communications in SGA newborns occurred significantly more often (PFO – р = 0.031, patent ductus arteriosus – р = 0.026) than in newborns with normal weight.
LGA and SGA newborns are characterized by the specific cardiovascular status. The revealed changes make it possible to assign infants with large and small birth weight to the risk group for the development of cardiovascular pathology, which requires dynamic observation as well as therapeutic and prophylactic measures.
Early and long-term clinical outcomes in patients with unstable angina and coronary artery stenting
Alena Miadzvedzeva, Ludmila Gelis, Oleg Polonetsky, Maryna Kaliadka
Aim. To study early and long-term clinical outcomes in patients with unstable angina (UA) and coronary artery stenting based on the results of a seven-year follow-up.
Materials and Methods. The study included 165 patients with UA and coronary artery stenting. The average age of patients was 59.04±10.34 years; the number of male patients was 129 (78.2%). The risk by the GRACE scale was 96.9±17.46 points. The average number of affected coronary arteries was 2.23±1.07 per person, the average number of implanted stents was 2.10±1.45 per person, the average length of the stented area was 43.12±25.6 mm. Everolimus- or sirolimus-eluting stents were used. All patients were assessed for troponin I, myeloperoxidase, and C-reactive protein; platelet, plasma, and vascular hemostasis were evaluated. The patients underwent echocardiography, coronary angiography. The follow-up period was 7±1.6 years.
Cholesterol-lowering treatment of patients with chronic heart failure after heart transplantation
A.K. Kurlianskaya
This scientific review is devoted to the assessment of the role and effects of statin therapy in the treatment of patients with heart failure (HF). The article overviews the possibilities of using new medications with a profound lipid-lowering effect in patients with HF, belonging to the class of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors (PCSK9). The results of our own research are also presented, the purpose of which was to study the association of statin therapy with the state of the coronary arteries (CA) in the long-term period after heart transplantation (HT).
Materials and methods. The data of 75 patients after HT were analyzed. Coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound were performed to assess coronary artery (CA) damage. The degree of coronary artery disease was determined according to the Stanford classification. In the dynamics of observation, biochemical parameters of blood were assessed.
Clinical and hemodynamic assessment of patients with non-rheumatic (functional) tricuspid heart valve insufficiency in patients with chronic forms of coronary heart disease or dilated cardiomyopathy
V.G. Krutov, V.V. Shumovets, Yu.P. Ostrovsky, I.E. Andraloits
Objectives: to study and compare the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of patients with functional (secondary) tricuspid insufficiency, depending on its etiology and depending on the surgical methods used in surgical practice for its correction.
Materials and methods: clinical and hemodynamic assessment of a population of patients with non-rheumatic tricuspid valve insufficiency (functional) in chronic forms of coronary heart disease (CHD) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP) was performed. The study included 792 patients who underwent correction of non-rheumatic tricuspid valve insufficiency (functional) during a period 2011–2020: 642 participants with coronary artery disease, 150 participants with DCMP. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were assessed. Results: In the analyzed patient population, in-hospital mortality after surgery in patients with CAD was significantly higher than in patients with DCMP, which can be explained by a number of factors, including the more severe nature of the pathology in patients with CAD (in the study, patients with multiple coronary arteries lesions and a high functional class of angina prevailed in the group of coronary artery disease), and a larger scale of surgical intervention. In patients with DCMP, a more significant dilatation of the right ventricular cavity and a significantly higher increase of right ventricle volumes were noted. At the same time, despite more significant remodeling of the left (LV) and right ventricles (RV), the level of systolic and mean pulmonary artery pressure did not differ significantly between patients with CAD and DCMP. There was no significant difference in the levels of dilatation and volume of the right atrium between patients with CHD and DCMP. Patients with DCMP showed more severe dilatation of the tricuspid valve annulus and the area of its orifice. However, when assessing the magnitude of the degree of severity of the functional tricuspid valve insufficiency, no significant differences were noted in almost all parameters, depending on the etiology. Despite a comparable volume of regurgitation and the degree of tricuspid valve insufficiency, patients with DCMP had a significantly more severe changed geometry of the tricuspid valve annulus. Ring plasty techniques were used in patients with more pronounced LV remodeling and severe LV systolic dysfunction. This, most likely, caused a more significant overload of the pulmonary circulation, causing a higher level of pulmonary hypertension and volume overload of the right heart. In patients with CHD, suture repair methods were more often used, and in patients with DCMP, ring methods of annuloplasty of the tricuspid valve were used more often. At the same time, regardless of the etiology, ring annuloplasty techniques were used with more severe functional insufficiency of the TV in patients with a significantly more significant decrease in right ventricular contractility.
Event-free survival of patients with acute myocardial infarction during 36 monthsafter ppci in combination with combined protocol of distant ischemic conditioning as a method of cardio protection
Y. Koraneva, A. Mrochek, V. Stelmashok, T. Denisevich
Background. Reperfusion injury occurs after revascularization of the coro-nary artery in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) significantly contributing to the development of chronic heart failure. This article describes the results of studying the effectiveness of one of the promising cardioprotection strategies aimed at limiting reperfusion injury.
Materials and methods. Patients with acute anterior MI with ST elevation (STEMI) (n = 87) were included in an open-label prospective randomized controlled trial. Intervention group (IG) patients underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) and remote ischemic preconditioning in combination with delayed postconditioning (RIPerPostC) (n = 43). Control group patients (CG) underwent only standard PPCI (n = 44). Event-free survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves.
Results. A comparative analysis of the frequency of the composite endpoint (re-hospitalizations for the underlying disease, repeated MI and death from cardiac causes) by the 36th month of follow-up had shown that the proportion of patients who reached the endpoint was significantly higher in the CG: 45.5% vs 20.9% in the IG (p = 0.015). According to the results of the log-rank test, there are statistically significant differences in the event-free survival of the analyzed groups (LR = 1.99, p = 0.047). The Kaplan-Meier curves of the CG and IG during the first 12 months after AMI did not differ visually in height and slope, which indicated the absence of intergroup differences in the cumulative functions of event-free survival during the indicated observation period. After 12 months, there was a discrepancy between the Kaplan-Meier curves due to the fact that the survival rate continued to decrease rapidly only in the CG. According to the survival function, in 25% of CG patients, adverse events occurred within the first 13 months after AMI. Taking into account censored observations, the cumulative proportion of patients without major clinical events 36 months after AMI in the IG was 74% versus 38% in the CG.
Conclusion. In patients with STEMI the DIPerPostC method in combination with PPCI has a positive effect on patient survival over 36 months in comparison with isolated PPCI. The highest number of adverse events occurred during the period from 12 to 36 months of observation in the CG.
Long-term results of minimally invasive epicardial video-assisted radiofrequency isolation of pulmonary veins in isolated atrial fibrillation
A. Zhyhalkovich, R. Zhmailik
Aim. To analyze long-term results of the use of minimally invasive epicardial video-assisted radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the pulmonary veins (PV) in patients with various forms of isolated atrial fibrillation (AF).
Materials and methods. Since February 2011 to December 2014, 22 patients (male/female – 21/1) with paroxysmal / persistent / long-standing persistent idiopathic form of AF were operated on the basis of the Republican Scientific and Practical Center “Cardiology”, 7 (31.8%) / 9 (41%) / 6 (27.2%) cases respectively. Mean age was 48.33 ± 9.37 (31–66) years old. The average duration of the history of AF before the operation was 58.6 ± 32.5 months. RFA was performed through a bilateral mini-thoracotomy approach using video endoscopy with the application of bipolar irrigated Gemini X ablative clamp electrodes. All patients underwent bilateral antral RFA isolation of the PVs. In 100% of patients it was possible to achieve a conduction block from the PV collectors.
Results of evaluation of biological and rheological parameters in patients after cholecystectomy
D.S. Herasimionak, V.A. Mansurov, N.P. Mitkovskaya
Background. Considering the change in the pathogenetic vector towards the studying of comorbidity, becomes crucial the search for biological predictors providing a more precise assessment of cardiovascular risk in specific subgroups of patients with moderate, unusual or undetectable risk levels (for example, in patients with background acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity).
Aim. Evaluation of some rheological and biochemical parameters in patients with acute calculous cholecystitis.
Comparison of hemodynamic parameters and long-term prognosis in patients after aortic valve replacement using Planiks-E and foreign equivalents
Ihar Andraloits
The article presents the results of aortic valve replacement with artificial prosthetic heart valves. The study comprised 422 patients after aortic valve replacement with mechanical bicuspid valve prostheses of 19, 21, and 23 mm. The valves used were «Planiks-E», MedIng-2, Carbomedics, ATS Medtronic, St. Jude Medical. Hospital and long-term results are analyzed directly depending on the type-size of the AMHV used. There was a significant decrease in the peak and average transvalvular gradient on the all aortic valves (p < 0.0015), as well as an increase in the effective orifice area (EOA) of the aortic valve. EOA of the prosthesis “Planiks E” was not significantly different from that of its foreign equivalents. The EOA of St.Jude Medical prostheses was significantly larger compared to the Sorin Carbomedics prostheses (p > 0.005). The peak and mean gradients were different significantly (p = 0.007 and p < 0.05). The highest maximum systolic gradient was observed with Sorin Carbomedics prostheses. The phenomenon of prosthesis-patient mismatch of moderate degree in the early postoperative period was observed in 30.3% of patients, and in 4.1% it was severe. For “Planiks-E” prostheses, severe PPM was observed in 3.2% of patients. “Planiks-E” and ATS Medtronic prostheses were less common related to moderate PPM, in 27.80% and 28.60% correspondently. Overall hospital mortality was 3.4%. The risk of developing moderate PPN was 1.66 (95% CI 1.087 – 2.539, p = 0.19). The follow-up period mediana was 3.4 (2.12÷5.93) years. There were no significant differences in survival between patients without or with different PPM degrees (log-rank test, p = 0.539). Among “Planiks-E” the five-year survival rate was 87%. The PPN phenomenon did not significantly affect long-term survival. The heart valve prosthesis “Planiks-E” is comparable in its hemodynamic parameters to similar imported prostheses, the risk of moderate PPN being significantly lower.
Review of the AAGT intensive care committee clinical consensus on the management of patients with rhabdomyolysis
A. Titova, M. Terenin, I. Dovgalevich, S. Motuz, A. Mishchenko
Rhabdomyolysis is a condition characterized by the primary (mechanical) or the secondary (metabolic) damage to skeletal muscles, resulting in cell death and massive release of potentially toxic substances into the general circulation. Alertness to this complex pathological condition is very low among primary care physicians. Most often, traumatologists-orthopedists and resuscitators deal with the clinical picture of rhabdomyolysis. However, an in-depth analysis of literature data on the etiopathogenesis of this process implies a wide range of specialties, who need knowledge of the clinical picture of the development of rhabdomyolysis as well as of therapeutic specifics and prevention to manage this specific contingent patient. At the end of 2021, the clinical consensus of the intensive care committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) took place, which resulted in the formulation of recommendations for the management of patients with rhabdomyolysis. The document reviews and compiles knowledge of the causes of muscle fiber breakdown, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of acute rhabdomyolysis in critically ill patients.

Guidelines for Authors

The presented requirements for scientific articles are based on the 'Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals' of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

I. Recommendations to the author before submitting an article

Articles that meet the following criteria may be submitted for consideration: 

  • The article has not been previously published in another journal
  • The article is not under consideration in another journal
  • All co-authors agree with the publication of the current version of the article
  • The article meets the basic requirements for publication in the journal “Neotlozhnaya kardiologiya i kardiovaskulyarnye riski” (“Emergency Cardiology and Cardiovascular Risks”)

The journal “Neotlozhnaya kardiologiya i kardiovaskulyarnye riski” (“Emergency Cardiology and Cardiovascular Risks”) accepts the following types of articles: original articles, reviews, interesting case reports, teaching articles and other.

Authors are encouraged to use the following checklists and charts developed by international health organizations (EQUATOR, Enhancing the Quality and Transparency of Health Research) when preparing original articles and other materials: “CONSORT 2010 checklist of information to include when reporting a randomizes trial”, “The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies”, “PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses)”, “The CARE Guidelines: Consensus-based Clinical Case Reporting Guideline Development”,  “SRQR (Standards for reporting qualitative research)”, “STARD 2015: An Updated List of Essential Items for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy Studies”.

Before submitting the article for consideration, make sure that the file(s) contains all the necessary information, the sources of the information in the figures and tables are indicated, all citations are properly formatted.

II. Submitting of an article 

One сору of the manuscript and signed accompanying documents (letters from the institution with the head's approval, cover letter) should be sent to the editorial board by mail. It is obligatory to send an electronic version of the article, graphic materials and digital copies (scans) of accompanying documents to the e-mail address of the journal - emcardio@bsmu.by

Articles are accepted by the editorial board with a referral letter having the head's signature of the institution (see the example of the referral letter on the journal's website).

While submitting a manuscript to the editorial board of the journal the cover letter from authors must be included, where the following points should be reflected (see the example of a cover letter on the journal's website):

  • the initials and last names of the authors
  • the article title
  • information that the article has not been previously published or submitted to another journal for consideration and publication
  • the authors' commitment that if the article is accepted for publication, they will give the copyright to the publisher
  • a statement that there are no financial or other conflict of interest
  • evidence that the authors have not received any form of reward from manufacturing companies, including competitors that could influence the results of the work
  • information about the authors' participation in the creation of the article
  • information about the authors' participation in the creation of the article
  • signatures of all authors

Manuscripts that do not meet the requirements are not accepted by the editorial board and the authors are informed about this decision. Correspondence with authors is carried out only by e-mail

Materials for publication should be sent to:

The journal “Neotlozhnaya kardiologiya i kardiovaskulyarnye riski”, ul. Leningradskaya, 6, kabinet 2, Minsk, 220006, Republic of Belarus

E-mail: emcardio@bsmu.by

Website: emcardio.bsmu.by

Contact phone number: +375173285892

III. Requirements for the formatting of the article

The article must be created using the Microsoft Word text editor of any version and have the following formatting:

Width of the left/upper/bottom/right margin is 3 cm/2.5 cm/2.5 cm/1 cm.

Font– Times New Roman, 12 points.

Line spacing 1,5.

Paragraph indent 1.25 cm

Font color black 

Orientation - portrait

Hyphenation – none

Alignment – justify

Headings and subheadings are started on a new line and typed in bold with left alignment without dot at the end. 1,25 cm paragraph indentation is left before the headings. Other formatting is not allowed in the text of the article.

IV. Structure of the article

The article should have the following structure:

1. The initials and last names of the authors

2. Title of the article.

3. Full name of the institutions in which the authors work, indicating the city and country (superscript Arabic numerals indicate the correspondence of the institutions)

4. An abstract in English (1800 to 2500 characters with spaces for original articles, at least 1000 characters for reviews and case reports) should be a brief summary of a large scientific work. It can be published independently from the main text, therefore, it should be understandable without reference to the publication itself. In terms of structure, it is advisable to repeat the sections of the article (for an original articles: purpose, methods, results, conclusion). The text of the abstract should be concise and clear, free of secondary information, superfluous introductory words, and general formulations. The abstract should not contain references to literature. No abbreviations or acronyms other than the commonly used ones should be used. The results of the work are described very accurately and informative. The abstract should contain main theoretical and experimental results, actual data, the relationships and patterns that have been found. Preference is given to new results and data of long-term significance, important discoveries, conclusions that refute existing theories, as well as data that, in the opinion of the author, are of practical importance. Conclusions may be accompanied by recommendations, assessments, suggestions, hypotheses described in the article.

5. Keywords - a set of words that reflect the content of the text in terms of the object, scientific field and research methods; the recommended number of keywords - 5-10.

6. The main text of the article. Depending on the type of manuscript, the structure of the full text may vary. The volume of article including figures, tables, references and abstracts in original articles and case reports should not exceed 30 thousand characters with spaces, in reviews and teaching articles - 45 thousand characters with spaces. Word abbreviations are not allowed except for common abbreviations of chemical and mathematical quantities, measures, terms. The SI system should be used in the articles.

6.1 Original articles  

Original articles contain the results of original research. 

  • Introduction (no more than 2 pages). It should reveal the relevance of the problem that became the subject of the study including its scope (prevalence, morbidity, etc.), mediated effects (social, economic), and identify solved and unsolved aspects of the problem with an analysis of previously published data
  • Purpose of the study 
  • Methods (the section should contain information about the study design, its term, the way of assessing the results of the study, testing the hypothesis of the study with a description of statistical methods and a package for processing the results)
  • Results (a detailed summary of the content and results of the study; if necessary, this section may be divided into subsections)
  • Discussion (the results should be discussed in regard of novelty and compared with known data)
  • Сonclusion (must be presented as a comprehensive text)
  • Source of funding 1 (should specify the source of funding for the performed work)
  • Conflict of interest 2 (the presence of obvious and potential conflicts of interest - conditions and facts that can affect the results of the study or their interpretation)
  • Acknowledgement 3

6.2 Review article

The purpose of a review article is to discuss the accumulated material and present the author's new view of previously described phenomena, rethinking, and searching for new approaches to their interpretation, rather than simply listing the facts and stating the current state of the issue.

Obligatory sections of a review article:

  • Introduction 
  • Discussion (can be isolated in a separate section or run smoothly through the entire text) 
  • Conclusion - (must be presented as a comprehensive text) 
  • Source of funding 1 (should specify the source of funding for the performed work)
  • Conflict of interest 2 (the presence of obvious and potential conflicts of interest - conditions and facts that can affect the results of the study or their interpretation)
  • Acknowledgement 3

1 - you should provide information about the sources of sponsorship in the form of grants, equipment, medicines.

2 - “conflict of interest” refers to the conditions under which people have conflicting or competing interests that can influence an editorial decision. Conflicts of interest can be potential, perceived, and real. Personal, political, financial, scientific, or religious factors may affect objectivity. The author must notify the editor of a real or potential conflict of interest by including information about the conflict of interest in the appropriate section of the article. If there is no conflict of interest the author must also declare it. Sample wording: “The team of authors declares that there is no conflict of interest”. 

3 - in the Acknowledgements section, acknowledgements are given to people who participated in the work on the article, but who are not the authors. Participation in the work on the article implies: recommendations to improve the research, providing space for research, departmental control, receiving financial support, single types of analysis, providing reagents/patients/animals/other materials for the research.

7. References (number of sources should be 25 or less for an original article and 50 or less for reviews) should be compiled according to the Harvard standard (Harvard reference system). Citations in text should be indicated by a number in square brackets (e.g., [1]). References to unpublished works are not allowed. References on sources in Russian should have following structure: authors (transliteration), title of the article in transliterated version [translation of article title into English in square brackets], title of the Russian-language source (transliteration) [translation of source title into English], output data with designations in English. Transliteration of Russian-language titles is performed according to the BSI standard. Examples of formatting of the reference list are listed below. 

References to books: 

  1. Rips L.J. Lines of thought: central concepts in cognitive psychology. Oxford : Oxford Univ. Press, 2011. 441 p.
  2. de Benoist B. et al., eds. Worldwide prevalence of anaemia 1993-2005. WHO Global Database on Anaemia Geneva, World Health Organization, 2008.
  3. Sorokina T.S. Istoriya meditsinyi [History of medicine]. M.: Academia, 2008, 560 p. (in Russian).
  4. Izvekov V.I., Serikhin N.A., Abramov A.I. Proektirovanie turbogeneratorov [Design of Turbo-generators]. Moscow, MEI Publ., 2005, 440 p. (in Russian).

References to journal articles:

  1. George G.W. Vetrovec Hemodynamic Support Devices for Shock and High-Risk PCI:When and Which One. Curr Cardiol Rep. 2017, vol. 19 no.10, pp. 100. doi: 10.1007/s11886-017-0905-3. 
  2. von Drygalski A., Adamson J.W. Ironing out fatigue. Blood, 2011, vol. 118, pp. 3191-3192.
  3. Huo T.I., Lin H.C., Lee S.D. Model for end-stage liver disease and organ allocation in liver transplantation: where are we and where should we go? J Chin Med Assoc, 2006, vol. 69, no. 5, pp. 193-198.
  4. Cholongitas E., Marelli L., Shusang V., Senzolo M., Rolles K., Patch D., Burroughs A.K. A systematic review of the performance of the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) in the setting of liver transplantation. Liver Transpl, 2006, vol. 12, no. 7, pp. 1049-1061.
  5. Ibanez B., James S., Agewall S., Antunes M.J., Bucciarelli-Ducci C., Bueno H., Caforio A.L.P., Crea F., Goudevenos J.A., Halvorsen S., Hindricks G., Kastrati A., Lenzen M.J., Prescott E., Roffi M., Valgimigli M., Varenhorst C., Vranckx P., Widimský P. 2017 ESC Guidelines for the management of acute myocardial infarction in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation: The Task Force for the management of acute myocardial infarction in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Eur Heart J, 2017, vol. 26. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehx393.
  6. Belov Yu.V., Varaksin V.A. Strukturno-geometricheskie izmeneniya miokarda i osobennosti zentral'noy gemodinamiki pri postinfarktnom remodelirovanii levogo zheludochka [Structural and geometric changes in the myocardium and features of central hemodynamics in postinfarction remodeling of the left ventricle]. Kardiologiya. 2003, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 19-23. (in Russian).
  7. Mit'kovskaya N.P., Toropilov D.M. Kardiorenal'nyy sindrom pri ostroy ishemicheskoy bolezni serdza [Cardiorenal syndrome in acute coronary heart disease]. Med. zhurnal, 2009, no. 1, pp. 19-23. (in Russian).
  8. Mitkovskaya N., Rummo O., Grigorenko E. Stratifikaziya riska vnezapnoy serdechnoy smerti u rezipientov transplantatov pecheni i pochek [Stratification of the risk of sudden cardiac death in recipients of liver and kidney transplants]. Kardiologiya v Belarusi, 2014, vol. 3, pp. 27-33. (in Russian).

References to articles from collection of articles: 

  1. Pavlyukovskaya E.G. Primenenie pribora spektrofotometr v stomatologicheskoy praktike [Application of the device spectrophotometer in dental practice]. Ctudenty i molodye uchyenye belorusskogo gosudarstvennogo medizinskogo universiteta - medizinskoy nauke i zdravoochraneniyu Respubliki Belarus : sb. nauch. tr. studentov i molodych uchyenych pod red. A. V. Sikorskogo, O. K. Doroninoy. Minsk : BGMU, 2016, pp. 317-320. (in Russian).

Reference to a thesis or dissertation

  1. Ponomareva M.N. Diagnostika i medikamentoznaya korrekziya narusheniy gemodinamiki pri ishemicheskoy neyropatii zritel'nogo nerva u bol'nych s serdechno-sosudistymi zabolevaniyami [Diagnosis and drug correction of hemodynamic disorders in ischemic neuropathy of the optic nerve in patients with cardiovascular diseases] : Diss. dokt. med. nauk : 14.01.07. M., 2010, 235 s. (in Russian).

Reference to patents

  1. Chichkin D.N, Ulaschik V.S., Mit'kovskaya N.P., Mucharskaya Yu.A., Kul'chizkiy V.A. Sposob lecheniya revmatoidnogo artrita [A method of treating rheumatoid arthritis]. Patent BY no 10617, 2006. (in Russian).

V. Information about the authors 

The section is provided at the end of the article and should contain the following information:

  • full name, academic title, degree, position, place of employment
  • working address, and contacts (e-mail, phone numbers, ORCID)

VI. Guidelines on Formatting Tables 

All tables should have a numbered header and clearly marked columns that are easy to read and understand. Table data should correspond to the data in the text but should not duplicate the information presented in it. References to tables in the text are obligatory.

Tables are numbered by arabic numerals in the order of the text. If there is only one table in the text then it is not numbered. The title of the table includes the table number and its name. Alignment of the title – “Left Align”. Title formatting example: Table 1. Scale of risk factors. No dot after the title is required.

Notes to the table are in the same font style and size as the main text (Times New Roman, 12 points), Alignment – “Justify”. Note is placed under the table and must contain the explanation of used abbreviations and other information which is necessary for the interpretation of the data presented in the table.

VII. Guidelines on Formatting Figures

Each figure must be accompanied by a numbered title. References to figures in the text are mandatory. 

Figures are numbered by arabic numerals in the order of the text. If there is only one figure in the text then it is not numbered. The title includes the number and the name of the figure. Alignment of the title – “Center Align”. Title formatting example: 'Figure 1. Normal electrocardiogram'. No dot after the figure title is required. A note to the figure should be in the same font style and size as the main text (Times New Roman, 12 points), Alignment – “Justify”, placed under the figure title and must contain the explanation of used abbreviations and other information which is necessary for the interpretation of the data presented in the figures.

Illustrations (graphs, diagrams, schemes, drawings) drawn with MS Office tools should be contrast and clear. Illustrations should be made in a separate file and saved as an image (in *.jpeg, *.bmp, *.gif format), and then placed in the manuscript file as a fixed figure. It is unacceptable to put any elements (arrows, captions) over the figure inserted in the manuscript file by means of MS WORD due to the great risk of their loss at the stages of editing and layout.

Photographs, screenshots, and other non-drawn illustrations should not only be inserted in the text of the manuscript but also uploaded separately as *.jpeg, *.bmp, *.gif files (*.doc and *.docx - in case additional marks are put on the image). The resolution of the image should be >300 dpi. The image files should be given a name corresponding to the number of the figure in the text.

Checklist for Preparing Material for Submission

Authors must acknowledge the following items to submit an article. The manuscript may be returned to the authors if it does not match them:

  1. The article has not been previously published nor it has been submitted for review and publication in another journal.
  2. The file of the submitted article is in Microsoft Word document format with figures and tables placed in the text after the references to them, i.e., all the information is submitted in one file.
  3. Full web addresses (URLs) for references are given where it is possible.
  4. The text is typed with the following parameters: font style – Times New Roman, font size – 12 points, line spacing 1,5, paragraph indent 12,5 mm, no word hyphenation. Margins: upper and bottom - 25 mm, left - 30 mm, right - 10 mm. All pages must be numbered; all illustrations, graphs and tables are placed in appropriate places in the text, not at the end of the document.
  5. The text complies with the stylistic and bibliographic requirements described in the 'Rules for Authors'.

The order of reviewing article manuscripts submitted to the scientific and practical peer-reviewed journal “Emergency Cardiology and Cardiovascular Risks”

Manuscripts of all scientific articles submitted to the editors are subject to mandatory review by two independent experts. Review is carried out by the scientists who are recognized experts in the field of reviewed materials and work in the field of knowledge to which the content of the manuscript belongs and who have had publications on the subject of the article under review over the last three years.

The author, supervisor of a scientific degree scholar or coauthors of the reviewed work cannot be reviewers. The review of a scientific article is issued in accordance with the Memo to the reviewer of scientific articles and materials submitted to the journal “Emergency Cardiology and Cardiovascular Risks”.

Manuscripts are not considered for publication in case they do not meet the “Rules for Authors” which are published for convenience in the journal and its electronic version.

The editor informs the author about the review result by providing a copy of the review. The review contains recommendations for publication, correction and improvement of the article or a reasonable refusal. The author of the manuscript may take into account the recommendations when preparing a new version of the article or reasonably refute them. Articles refined by the author are resubmitted for review by a reviewer who made critical comments. The incoming date is considered to be the date of the refined article submission. If the author disagrees with the reviewer's comments, he may apply for a second review engaging a third expert or withdraw the article.

Articles and article reviews are discussed at the meeting of the editorial board, which serves as a basis to accept or reject an article. The decision of the editorial board is registered in by the protocol.

The order and priority of publications are determined depending on the volume of published materials and the list of subdivisions in a particular issue.

The editorial board does not guarantee the publication of all submitted materials. The article will not be accepted for consideration if it has been published or sent to other journals, the authors have not provided their complete personal data or the article does not meet the “Rules for Authors”. The editors reserve the right to edit the article without notifying the authors.

The final decision on the expediency of publications after their reviewing is made by the editorial board.

Articles not allowed for publication:

  • manuscripts which are not related to the scientific area of the journal;
  • manuscripts which do not meet the design requirements and their authors refuse to make their technical refinement;
  • manuscripts, the authors of which did not change the article according to the constructive requirements of the reviewer;

manuscripts, representing significant plagiarism due to copying data or conclusions from another author’s research without proper citation/reference (according to the recommendations of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and COPE (Committee on Publication Ethics)); resubmission of the publication under the name of another author (in the original language or in translation); verbatim copying of more than 100 words from another (including his own) publication in the absence of a properly arranged quotation; unpublished borrowings of previously published ideas or hypotheses of other authors, and/or those that have not been tested by the “Anti-plagiarism” Automatic Text Checking System for borrowing from publicly available information sources.

If plagiarism is suspected:

the editorial board informs the experts and the author(s) of the material in writing about the initiation of the editorial investigation and its expected timeframe (2 months). Based on the results of the editorial investigation, a written statement is drawn up (stored in the editorial office), copies of which are provided to the person who discovered the fact of plagiarism and the author(s) about the decision made and the undertaken actions.

In case of insignificant plagiarism the editors of the journal must notify the author about the fact of plagiarism and obtain written explanations. If a violation by the author is qualified as unintentional, confine to a reprimand and sending a message about the inappropriateness of repeated cases. A revised manuscript with references to all original sources of borrowing may be published.

Manuscripts and electronic versions of both published and unpublished materials are not returned.

Reviews are kept in the editorial office for five years.

About Us

ISSN 2616-633X

Publishing semi-annual
Articles in Russian. Summaries in English

Address:

Dzerzhinski Ave., 83, Minsk, Republic of Belarus, 220116
Tel: +375 17 277-12-01.
Fax: +375 17 277-12-02
E-mail:  emcardio@bsmu.by
Web-site:  https://emcardio.bsmu.by

Editor-in-chief: Prof. Natalya P. Mitkovskaya, MD, PhD. Educational Institution «Belarusian State Medical University», Minsk, Belarus

Executive Secretary: Ekaterina B. Petrova, PhD Educational Institution «Belarusian State Medical University», Minsk, Belarus

Executive Editorial Office Secretary: Olga V. Laskina. Educational Institution «Belarusian State Medical University», Minsk, Belarus

 

Editor-in-chief greeting

 

Publication Ethics

Editorial Board

Sikorskij A.V., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor  (Minsk, Belarus)
Vojtovich T.N., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Gelis L.G., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Gubkin S.V., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Danilova L.I., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Dzjadz`ko A.M., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Karpov I.A., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Kirkovkij V.V., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Kozlovkij V.i., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Vitebsk, Belarus)
Kopitov A.V., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Ostrovskij Ju.P. A.Yu., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor  (Minsk, Belarus)
Petrova M.N., PhD in Philological sciences, Associate Professor  (Minsk, Belarus)
Pristrom A.M., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Rudenko E.V., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Rudenok V.V., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Ruzanov D.Yu., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Gomel, Belarus)
Salivonchik D.P., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Gomel, Belarus)
Sidorovich E. K., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Sudzhaeva O.A., Grand PhD in Medical sciences (Minsk, Belarus)
Uss A.L., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Tsapaeva N.L., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Yanushko A.V., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Grodno, Belarus)

 

Advisory Editorial Board

(International Consultative Committee)

Abel`skaya I.S., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Khryshchanovich V.Ya., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Azimferey Leonhard, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Tîrgu Mureș, Romania)
Arutjunov G.P., Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences , Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Moscow, Russian Federation)
Bedel'baeva G.G., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Almaty, Kazakhstan)
Beljaeva L.N., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Vismont F.I., Corresponding Member of the National Academy of Sciences o Belarus , Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Dzhunusbekova G.A., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Almaty, Kazakhstan)
Drapkina O.M., Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences , Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Moscow, Russian Federation)
Dudarenko S.V., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (St. Petersburg, Russian Federation)
Kamilova U.K., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Tashkent, Uzbekistan)
Kibira Satoshi, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Akita, Japan)
Koziolova N.A., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Perm, Russian Federation)
Kostjuk William, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (London, Canada)
Krasnyj S.A., Corresponding Member of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Kubarko A.I., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Kul'chickij V.A., Corresponding Member of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus,  Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Linn Tommi, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Stockholm, Sweden)
Mrochek A.G., Academician of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus,  Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Oganov R.G., Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences,  Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Moscow, Russian Federation)
Ostrovskij Ju.P., Academician of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus,  Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Pershagen Joran, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Stockholm, Sweden)
Pinevich D.L., First Deputy Minister of Health of the Republic of Belarus (Minsk, Belarus)
Rebrov A.P., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Saratov, Russian Federation)
Rud Charls, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Berkeley, USA)
Rummo O.O., Corresponding Member of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Skugarevskij O.A., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Snezhickij V.A., Corresponding Member of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Grodno, Belarus)
Sukalo A.V., Academician of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus,  Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Tiffi Patrik, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (London, Canada)
Tret'jak S.I., Corresponding Member of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Fedoruk A.M., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Hirmanov V.N., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (St. Petersburg, Russian Federation)
Zhebentyayev A.I., Grand PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor (Vitebsk, Belarus)
Gurina N.S., Grand PhD in Biological sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Tsarenkov V.M., Grand PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Khishova O.M., Grand PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor (Vitebsk, Belarus)
Kuznetsov V.A., Grand PhD in Medical sciences, Professor (Tyumen, Russian Federation)

 

Publishing Group

Balysh E. M., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Rachok L.V., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Volod'ko Ju.S., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Gerasimenok D.S., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Grigorenko E.A., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Mazanik Ju.N., (Minsk, Belarus)
Martusevich N.A., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Pyko A.A., PhD in Medical sciences (Minsk, Belarus)
Rustamov M.N., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Skakun L.N., (Minsk, Belarus)
Statkevich T.V., PhD in Medical sciences, Associate Professor (Minsk, Belarus)
Tenjushko E.S., (Minsk, Belarus)
Lanushevskaia A.V., (Minsk, Belarus)
Korzhenevskaia Iu.V., (Minsk, Belarus)
Tkachyova O.A., design, computer layout (Minsk, Belarus)
Vinokurov V.F., design, computer layout (Minsk, Belarus)
Zhuk L.I., editor (Minsk, Belarus)